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Colon Cancer

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Colon Cancer

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

Colon cancer is a cancer of the colon or rectum, located at the digestive track's lower end. It is the 2nd leading cause of cancer death among men and women in the Untied States, with more than 140,000 U.S. cases each year and 50,000 deaths.

 

What You Can Do

  • If you’re aged 50 to 75, get screened for colorectal cancer regularly. Screening tests help prevent colorectal cancer by finding precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) so they can be removed. Screening also finds this cancer early, when treatment can be most effective.
  • Be physically active.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don’t drink too much alcohol.
  • Don’t smoke.

Symptoms

Requires a medical diagnosis

Colorectal cancer symptoms depend on the size and location of the cancer. Some commonly experienced symptoms include changes in bowel habits, changes in stool consistency, blood in the stool, and abdominal discomfort.

People may experience:

  • Pain areas: in the abdomen
  • Gastrointestinal: blood in stool, change in bowel habits, constipation, narrow stools, or passing excessive amounts of gas
  • Whole body: anemia or fatigue
  • Also common: abdominal discomfort or weight loss

Facts

  • Risk increases with age. More than 90% of colorectal cancers occur in people aged 50 and older.
  • Precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms, especially at first. You could have polyps or colorectal cancer and not know it. That is why having a screening test is so important. If you have symptoms, they may include—
    • Blood in or on the stool (bowel movement).
    • Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that do not go away.
    • Losing weight and you don’t know why.

These symptoms may be caused by something other than cancer. If you have any of them, see your doctor.

  • Some people are at a higher risk than others for developing colorectal cancer. If you think you may be at high risk, talk to your doctor about when and how often to get tested.
  • There are several screening test options. Talk with your doctor about which is right for you.
    • Colonoscopy (every 10 years).
    • High-sensitivity fecal occult blood test (FOBT), stool test, or fecal immunochemical test (FIT) (every year).
    • Sigmoidoscopy (every 5 years, with FOBT every three years).

Treatments

Treatable by a medical professional

Colorectal cancer treatment depends on the size, location, and how far the cancer has spread. Common treatments include surgery to remove the cancer, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.